Tag Archives: miamuseum

Something Different, Something New: The Making of ‘Unikkaaqtuat’

23 Jul

It’s hard to believe I only arrived at the museum two months ago, and that my internship is almost over. Everyone here has made me feel so welcome; it’s made my internship just fly by. So much has happened in that short period of time that it’s hard to fit everything into just a few paragraphs. To cover some of the main points, while I’ve been here I’ve gotten to apply everything I learnt in school to actual situations. I’ve had the opportunity to catalogue and condition report objects, to transport object, and to pack and store objects – all things I’ve learnt theoretically but seldom in practice. I have gotten to grow, to learn, and to be confident in my opinions and ideas.

rolling up works on paper for return

Myself and the MIA Collections Manager preparing some works on paper to be returned.

Being able to state my opinions and ideas with confidence is the most important part of this internship for me, and it is what helped make our newest exhibition Unikkaaqtuat: Inuit Creation Stories a reality. When I first started I was asked, somewhat in passing, to think about what a new exhibition could be. There were a few options, but nothing stood out to me except finding a way to explore Inuit myths and legends. I did not know much, but I was eager to learn more.  That’s how I began the research for this exhibition – by reading a wide variety of myths and legends, and I started with Inhabit Media’s “Unikkaaqtuat: An Introduction to Inuit Myths and Legends.” As soon as the idea solidified I emailed Inhabit Media, and got great feedback from their organization. I got to choose some of my favourite stories, and with MIA’s Collections Manager I got to look through the museum collection to find objects to accompany those stories. Together Lauren and I narrowed down our list, and chose objects to best reflect the stories. From that point on it became a matter of organization. Which stories would go beside each other? Which objects look best when paired together? What can we do to create the best impact?

We planned this exhibition to be as family-friendly as possible, to add colour, lower plinths, and create interactive components to help entice parents to bring their children to the museum. Objects and text panels were placed lower on the wall to help children interact with the objects. We’ve even added a LEGENDary Theatre so visitors can use puppets to act out the stories they’ve read in the exhibit or share their own stories.

There are five different stories represented in the case, each accompanied by art from the MIA permanent collection.

There are five different stories represented in the case, each accompanied by art from the MIA permanent collection.

As the exhibition planning and execution continued to progressed, it became obvious to me that this would become an exhibition with a selection of some of my favourite stories, and objects. From light and humorous to dark and frightening, this exhibition explores different stories of how things came into existence.

Following the opening more programming, tours, and art activities will connect with the show and I hope you have a chance to see it this summer.

– Posted by Taylor M., MIA’s Collections Intern

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Greetings from the newest MIA Development Officer

28 May
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Christine Platt, Development Officer, with her favourite Abraham Anghik Ruben artwork, “Raven and Sedna,” 2009

Hello everybody!

My name is Christine Platt, and I just joined the MIA team as a Development Officer! I am excited to work on the Inuit Art Magazine, the Canadian Inuit Art Project and much more. I especially look forward to sharing knowledge and ideas on contemporary Inuit art with all of you.

Before joining MIA, I completed a Masters in Museum Studies and a Masters in contemporary Chinese art. I also worked for a contemporary art fund in the Netherlands, and I’ve volunteered at many museums while living and working around the world (including at MIA as a docent).

I hope that together with the MIA staff and volunteers, I will help to engage an even wider audience in learning and experiencing Inuit art. I particularly aim to help attract more collectors to enter the contemporary Inuit art market. The artworks featured at the museum and in the gallery express so much in form, style, emotion and cultural heritage, which could enhance many private and corporate collections and the personal life experiences of our visitors and friends.

I will write on the blog to tell you more about this as I collaborate on different projects in the museum. Stay tuned for more!

-posted by Christine Platt, Development Officer