Tag Archives: john kurok

Adopt an Object: Shaman’s Journey

27 Jan
John Kurok Shaman's Journey 1 edited

This ceramic work “Shaman’s Journey” by John Kurok is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – John Kurok’s “Shaman’s Journey”

Artist: John Kurok (b. 1977)
Location: Kangirqliniq (Rankin Inlet)
Date: 2005
Medium: Ceramic
Dimensions (H x W x D): 11” x 12” x 12”
Collection: MIA Collection

Significance: The modern period of ceramic production was revived with the opening of Matchbox Studio in 1987 after an initial government-run experiment closed several years earlier. Shaman’s Journey, a hand-built rather than a wheel-made piece, is a superb example of fine art ceramics being produced in the community with its vessel form and sculptural appliqués. John Kurok is known for depicting intricate and lifelike faces and birds in his artwork, which are evident in this beautifully executed piece. John is instrumental in teaching other artists about how to use clay and is currently responsible for the firing of all ceramics at Matchbox Studio.

Adoption Rate: $200

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

The Running Date at MIA!

15 Oct

Today we were very excited to have the participants of the Running Date (http://runningdate.ca) visit the museum as one of their stops in this competition inspired by the Amazing Race designed specifically for couples.

In order to complete the challenge at the museum, one member of the couple team had to find a sculpture in the museum and sculpt this same piece using some play-doh.

A participant in the Running Date sculpts her play-doh masterpiece.

Another participant proudly showing his sculpture for the Running Date competition.

Next, the other team member  had to sketch the play-doh sculpture, and then try to match their sketch to the original sculpture in the museum. Once a successful match was made, the team  had completed the challenge and could move on to their next stop in the competition.

Running Date volunteer Damien with one happy team who has successfully completed the MIA challenge.

We had a great time hosting this challenge for the event, and I must say, we were quite impressed by the artistic talents of the Running Date competitors!

Some play-doh sculptures made by teams from Running Date.

– Posted by: Kate Mossman, MIA’s Development Officer

Trip Update

23 Sep

Hello, everyone!

Sorry I’ve been away from the blog for a few days – we’ve been incredibly busy here. We got to go out on the land near Rankin Inlet yesterday – pictures are uploading to Flickr right now. We got to see a traditional sod house, or qammaq recreated by local elders, as well as lots of snow geese, Canadian geese and another siksiq, or Arctic ground squirrel. Unlike the last one, which was hidden in the grass, this one came right up to us – because we were between it and its burrow.

In addition, we’ve been spending time getting to know all of the artists at the Matchbox Gallery and Kangirqliniq Centre for Learning and Arts. As part of our project development here, I’ve been interviewing all of the artists and it has been amazingly rewarding so far. We’ll be sharing parts of those interviews over the coming weeks.

Interviewing John Kurok

– Posted by: Alysa Procida, MIA’s Educa 

Ceramic Production Part 1

20 Sep

Today was a huge day for us here in Kangirqliniq (Rankin Inlet). As I mentioned yesterday, we had been popping by the Matchbox Gallery last weekend, but today we were there the whole day in order to do some work. Part of that work is documenting and researching some of their collection and part of it is getting to know the artists and share their process with you.

From left to right: Phillip Ugjuk, Jack Nuviak, Amauyah Noah and Jim Shirley sketching

First, a bit of background on the program. The Government of the Northwest Territories set up a ceramics program in Rankin Inlet in 1963 in order to provide jobs for local Inuit when the nearby Nickel Mine shut down (this was before the creation of Nunavut, when the NWT was administering the area). The program encountered several obstacles – things as basic as obtaining clay were challenges. There is local clay available, but the labor costs to process it are extremely high. Eventually, that program closed. In the 1980s, Jim Shirley came to the community and was inspired to begin another program. With his wife Sue, he opened the Matchbox Gallery in 1987 and revived ceramics making here.

The Kangirqliniq Centre for Learning and Arts operates with the same people on the same premises as the Matchbox. The KCLA realizes the Shirleys vision of artistic production: a communal, collaborative program that is supportive, holistic and enriching. Each day, artists begin by journaling in order to externalize and process whatever they are feeling; then, they do brief math and reading exercises. These activities perform several essential functions: they help to increase analytical and problem-solving skills, have clear real world enrichment and help to build self-confidence. With this base, everyone then completes some drawing exercises – often still lifes and portraits. These skills are the foundations of the program – the spatial reasoning needed to draw successfully translates into other art forms. Then, individual artists work on their own projects.

Today, we were able to participate in this process which was a true honor. Instead of simply documenting works, we really were integrated into the activities today. For example, today’s portrait subject was our Director, David.

(From left to right:) Philip Ugjuk, Helen Iguptak, Amauyah Noah, Jack Nuviak, Jim Shirley and David Harris look at sketches - of David.

I should also clarify something I said early – not exactly everyone participates in the drawing exercises. Veteran ceramicist Yvo Samgushak had no time or interest in sketching and instead moved directly to working on his own work. He later communicated to me that he though drawing was crazy (Yvo is deaf and communicates primarily using Inuktitut sign language).

Yvo Samgushak focuses on his own work while Jack Nuviak (left) and Jim Shirley sketch in the background.

In addition to Yvo, John Kurok, Jack Nuviak, Helen Iguptak, Amauyah Noah and Phillip Ugjuk were working, as well as Jim and Sue. The emphasis on collaboration in the studio was clear: Helen and Amauyah, for example, normally create dolls and prints, respectively. Today, they were working on creating clay masks. They helped each other, asked Phillip about sculpting noses and had input from John and Jack, too. There was lots of laughter in the studio. And just amazing material being created.

Amauyah Noah (left) and Helen Iguptak helping each other create masks.

They are all extremely gracious and friendly and I’m extremely grateful that they allowed me to photograph and film them working. I have to edit the movies before they go up on Youtube, but the photos are up on Facebook and Flickr currently. I further get the opportunity to speak to them individually this week about their work – if you have questions you’d like me to ask, let me know. I will keep posting updates as we work through the week  – if the rest of the week is anything like today, we are all in for some real treats.

Posted by: Alysa Procida, MIA’s Educational Coordinator