Tag Archives: collection

Get Up Close and Personal: Please DO Touch!

21 Aug

Over the past few weeks, Serena -the museum’s Summer YCW work intern, has been developing more interactive programming inside the museum. After brainstorming, researching, testing and training volunteers she was able to launch Get Up Close and Personal to share art works directly with museum visitors. Read about her experience creating the new program below.


Keeping museum pieces secure and safe from harm is a priority at any museum or art gallery. No museum is complete without a large sign or two saying “PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH”. However, if you’ve been to MIA in the last couple of months on a Thursday afternoon, you may have had the chance to participate in our new Get Up Close and Personal sessions.

These interactive sessions offer visitors the unique opportunity to touch objects from the MIA Educational Collection. Pieces in our Educational Collection are meant to be handled, so visitors can feel free to pick them up and learn more about the texture and material of each object.

I’ve been running these weekly Get Up Close and Personal sessions since July, and the results have been overwhelmingly positive so far. Visitors enjoy engaging in this tactile experience and trying to guess what material each piece is made of based on its texture.

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Serena is all set to go for ‘Get Up Close and Personal’. You can join a session every Thursday from 1-2 PM in the museum.

It’s quite interesting to see how visual appreciation of the works in the museum translates to visitors’ tactile experiences – I often ask visitors to feel the porous texture of the antler doll in the collection and to guess what material it is made of. The most common answers are “bone” and “wood”, so most visitors are surprised to learn that the doll is made of antler, which caribou shed every year.

It has been especially rewarding to see how visitors make connections between what they have already seen in the museum and what they are holding in their hands. Once visitors find out that the carved ivory piece is a walrus tusk, many of them mention the narwhal tusk and the small ivory sculptures in the historical case at the museum.

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Pieces from the museum’s Educational Collection that reflect the different types of materials and textures you can find in art produced by Inuit.

I’ve even encountered visitors who are familiar with Inuit art and have recognized different types of stone, pointing to Pudliak Shaa’s “Dancing Goose” and saying, “is that serpentine?”

These interactions with visitors are part of what makes working at MIA so fulfilling. I love contributing to visitor learning and watching visitors discover more about Inuit art. If you’d like to see (and touch) these objects for yourself, be sure to drop by the museum on Thursdays from 1-2 PM!

Posted by Serena Y., MIA’s Community Engagement Officer

Introducing our new Collections Intern!

8 May
Taylor
Hi! My name is Taylor Maunder and I am excited to be the new Collection Management Intern.

 

I am currently a student at Georgian College’s Museum and Gallery Studies post-graduate program. I came into this program after starting my university career at the University of Ottawa as a Science student. It wasn’t until my second year there that I found, and fell in-love with, the university’s Classical Studies program. After switching programs midway through my second year, I found a little museum associated with the school, the Museum of Classical Antiquities. As a third year student I began volunteering there and soon began to love museum work, working up with objects so often left behind glass. So I decided to pursue a career in museum work.

 

And so I searched for an internship position which would allow me to working with a collection of objects that I found interesting and knew little about. This, of course, led me to the Museum of Inuit Art. I will be the Collections Management Intern for the next four months where I will be working beside Lauren Williams and the other staff of MIA to gain as much knowledge as I can! I hope to be gaining knowledge on current museum practices, applying some of my schooling, and of course learning about Inuit Art, the culture and the artists.

 

– Posted by Taylor M., MIA’s Collections Intern

Introducing Our Collections Management Officer!

15 Jul
The Museum of Inuit Art is excited to welcome our third summer student for 2014. This Collections Management Officer position was funded by the Métis Nation of Ontario through the Summer Career Placement program.

 
My name is Jessica MacLean, I’m excited to be joining the MIA collections team this summer through a partnership with the Métis Nation of Ontario.

I hold a BA in History and Art from the University of Victoria. This September I will be starting my Post Grad at Fleming in Cultural Heritage Management and Conservation. I am passionate about preserving Aboriginal material culture, so I feel like my time at MIA will be an amazing learning experience. I’m looking forward to working with a variety of objects. I have just started work with the Moorehead Collection, a collection of works on paper by artist Malaya Akulukjuk, which I am already loving. I hope to be able to share my work with everyone on the museum’s Instagram, so stay tuned!

– Posted by: Lindsay Bontoft, MIA’s Public Programming and Development Coordinator

Visitor Evaluation: Follow Your Art

8 Jul

Over the past month, the MIA has been conducting visitor evaluations on the ‘Follow Your Art’ program. We want to find out how well the program is working to enhance the visitor experience, and through the administration of surveys, we are getting closer to this goal.

The ‘Follow Your Art’ program is a self-guided option within the museum which seeks to enable visitors to appreciate the stylistic elements of the pieces and gain a deeper understanding of Inuit art.

To gauge the efficacy of this program, we have created a short survey for guests to complete toward the end of their visit. In order to keep answers as accurate as possible, the surveys have been independently filled out by visitors without interference by administrators.

So far, the findings have been interesting! Of all the participants to date, 98.0% of visitors who experienced ‘Follow Your Art’ reported feeling a deeper connection to the art, with 70.0% of that group feeling a personal connection. In addition, 94.1% of respondents experienced an increase in understanding after experiencing ‘Follow Your Art’.

When the data collection is complete, we will be conducting a thorough analysis of the responses, with more detailed findings available. Until then, drop by the museum to experience the evaluation process first-hand!

 Posted by: Serena Ypelaar, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Introducing Our YCW Summer Students!

7 Jun

We would like to formally welcome our two summer students, Serena and Lauren, to the team. MIA will be focusing its energy on some of its core operations over the summer thanks to the help of two summer student positions funded through Young Canada Works. Our ‘Follow Your Art’ program will  undergo rigorous evaluation by our Visitor Services Officer while new acquisitions are processed with the help of our Collections Management Officer.

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My name is Serena Ypelaar and I’m thrilled to have joined the MIA team as Visitor Services Officer!

I’m a student at the University of Ottawa, pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in History and English Literature. I’m passionate about museums, and I’m eager to contribute at MIA! This summer, I will be evaluating the Follow Your Art program here at the museum. Part of this project involves the development of a study to gain insight on the success of the program. I will survey museum visitors in the hope of understanding how the Follow Your Art program has affected their overall MIA experience.

The Follow Your Art program is a self-guided tour option at the MIA which seeks to highlight the varying elements of Inuit art. The program involves a personality quiz which allows visitors to discover which art style (Realism, Minimalism, Expressionism, Abstract or Grotesque) appeals to them. With this insight, visitors can follow the different styles throughout the museum, hopefully gaining a deeper understanding of the art in addition to a personal connection with the works. The Follow Your Art program is designed to be thought-provoking and to challenge expectations of Inuit art.

I’m pleased to have the opportunity to work in such a wonderful museum, where I hope to expand my knowledge of museum work and Inuit art. I look forward to meeting you!

 

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My name is Lauren Williams and I will be spending the summer at the MIA as the Collections Management Officer!

As a recent graduate of the Master of Museum Studies program at the University of Toronto I am excited to be working in my chosen field!  I always loved museums from what I could see as a visitor but it wasn’t until I began studying museology that I realized that I wanted to work in collections management. My first foray into the collections field was interning in the Artifacts Department at the Ontario Science Centre last summer.  It was there that I gained experience working with a large variety of objects – from wooden looms to carbon fibre violins.  I am excited for the opportunity to continue to diversify my collections experience and MIA is the perfect place for me to do this! Already I am enjoying learning about the different types of materials used in Inuit art such as stone, bone, ivory, and antler.  I love that sometimes collections work can have lots of similarities to detective work – I am always following clues and researching – and am excited to solve some mysteries in the MIA collection!

 

– Posted by: Lindsay Bontoft, MIA’s Public Programming and Development Coordinator

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