Tag Archives: canada

Be Part of MIA: Adopt an Object

11 Jan

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This year, MIA is  really excited to launch a new fundraising program: Adopt an Object!

Supporters of art made by Inuit can now select a piece of the museums Permanent Collection currently on display and symbolically “adopt” that piece for a one year term. MIA’s staff members have selected some of their favourite objects as candidates for adoption based on their unique characteristics, notable history and impressive craftsmanship. Each of these pieces will be highlighted in future blog posts, so be sure to check back in and see our selection.

The ‘Adoption Package’ includes:

  • a photograph and description of the piece you have chosen to adopt, which you can proudly display in your home, office or classroom
  • names of individuals will be entitled to have their names listed as Adopters on the object labels within the museum space
  • recognition on our websites Donors’ page
  • name included in the museum’s Annual Report
  • invitation to a special cocktail reception to thank all participants for their generous contributions to the museum
  • additional programming opportunities are also available upon discussion with the Associate Curator Alysa Procida

All funds raised from this initiative will go directly into the educational programming and continued preservation of MIA’s collection. As a public institution that holds its work in public trust, conservation of the museum’s collection is one of MIA’s top priorities. This is especially true for those objects made out of sensitive materials such as ivory, textile or paper. At the same time, MIA is southern Canada’s only museum devoted exclusively to art made by Inuit, meaning that the museums ability to effectively offer engaging educational programming is crucial. Through the Adopt an Object program, staff hope to acquire resources to help us manage these challenges. This will allow us to continue to educate the public about the art and its conservation.

Adoption Rates:

  • Small stone, antler and ivory pieces                                              $150
  • Medium stone, antler and ivory pieces                                         $300
  • Large stone, antler and ivory pieces                                              $500
  • Ceramic pieces                                                                                   $200
  • Wall hangings and soft sculpture works                                       $200
  • Prints and textile pieces                                                                   $200
  • Prints and Wall hangings made by Master Artists                     $700
  • Sculptures made by Master Artists                                                $1,000

All donors adopting an object will be issues a tax receipt. Rates are established based on the material and size of the artifact being adopted. After the priority works listed above have been adopted, additional opportunities will become available.

We thank all those that choose to support us in this endeavor by adopting an object. It is through the generous contributions of such individuals that we are able to further our mission: “to ethically acquire, conserve, research, communicate and exhibit for the purpose of study, education and enjoyment, material evidence of the history of Inuit art and culture in the Canadian Arctic”.

Posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

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Surprise Guests!

21 Oct

It’s not often we get surprises at the museum, but last week we had a very nice one: Stephen A Smith and Julia Szucs, the directors of Vanishing Point (Katinngat) came by to visit. You may remember that the film played as part of the Planet in Focus festival here in Toronto last week, but what you may not know is that our staff took a “field trip” together to see it, since we were one of the co-presenters.

Stephen A. Smith and Julia Szucs, directors of Vanishing Point (Katinngat).

Stephen A. Smith and Julia Szucs, directors of Vanishing Point (Katinngat) stopped by to see us this afternoon!

The film was beautifully shot and an interesting take on the connections between Inuit living in Canada and in Greenland. The official synopsis is:

Two Inuit communities in the circumpolar Arctic, linked by lineage to a legendary shaman, navigate through the greatest social and environmental challenges in their history.

Seemingly pristine and untouched, the Arctic is profoundly impacted by globalization. Vanishing Point brings to light the interconnectedness of isolated Arctic society with the rest of humanity through the eyes of an Inuit elder, Navarana K’avigak. And as the world melts beneath their feet, the last great hunting culture confronts an uncertain future.

Vanishing Point (Katinngat) is scheduled for a number of screenings (like in Banff October 27) and you can see their schedule on their website or Facebook. Want it to come where you live? Let them (and local film festival organizers) know!

Posted by: Alysa Procida, MIA’s Director of Education, Operations

Get Free Admission to MIA, Thanks to Justin Bieber

28 Jul

By now, you may have read my last blog about what we can learn from Justin Bieber’s comments from a Rolling Stone article about his possible indigenous heritage. In case you haven’t, he is quoted in Rolling Stone as saying:

I’m actually part Indian,” he says — “I think Inuit or something? I’m enough percent that in Canada I can get free gas.”

MIA invites Justin Bieber for a tour

Part of our outreach to the Biebs

Our response was just one of many – many people across Canada and on the internet are upset about this evidently offhand remark that was not even the focus on the article in question. Some articles question why, precisely, the remark was upsetting, but I think we covered that in my earlier blog. The real question is: what do we do about it?

This is important because Justin Bieber’s remarks are emblematic of a pervasive confusion many Canadians (and others) have about Aboriginal peoples within Canada. We reached out to Bieber himself (you can see our Tweet to him above), as well as the editors of Rolling Stone asking for a correction to be published. But that doesn’t really seem like enough.

So we’re offering complimentary admission through the end of August for fans of Justin Bieber and anyone else who would like to learn about Aboriginal cultures. All you have to do is come to our front desk and say “No Free Gas But Free Admission”. And spread the word using “#NoFreeGasButFreeAdmission” on Twitter – the more people who can come, the better.

We may not be able to offer you free gas, but we can offer you free admission – and maybe a glimpse of Justin Bieber himself.

Update: If you tweet an accurate fact about Inuit or First Nations art or history with the hashtag #nofreegasbutfreeadmission, you can pick up a complimentary copy of our book Inuit Art in Canada during your visit.

-Posted by: Alysa Procida, MIA’s Director of Education, Operations and Outreach