Tag Archives: abraham anghik ruben
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Greetings from the newest MIA Development Officer

28 May
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Christine Platt, Development Officer, with her favourite Abraham Anghik Ruben artwork, “Raven and Sedna,” 2009

Hello everybody!

My name is Christine Platt, and I just joined the MIA team as a Development Officer! I am excited to work on the Inuit Art Magazine, the Canadian Inuit Art Project and much more. I especially look forward to sharing knowledge and ideas on contemporary Inuit art with all of you.

Before joining MIA, I completed a Masters in Museum Studies and a Masters in contemporary Chinese art. I also worked for a contemporary art fund in the Netherlands, and I’ve volunteered at many museums while living and working around the world (including at MIA as a docent).

I hope that together with the MIA staff and volunteers, I will help to engage an even wider audience in learning and experiencing Inuit art. I particularly aim to help attract more collectors to enter the contemporary Inuit art market. The artworks featured at the museum and in the gallery express so much in form, style, emotion and cultural heritage, which could enhance many private and corporate collections and the personal life experiences of our visitors and friends.

I will write on the blog to tell you more about this as I collaborate on different projects in the museum. Stay tuned for more!

-posted by Christine Platt, Development Officer

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“Getting” Art with Alysa

14 May

More musings from the MIA intern coming at ya!

When I first came into the museum studies program I thought that I would be surrounded by students who loved art as much I do. I had this vision of people gathered together at an exhibition opening, talking about such-and-such an artist and their brilliant project -which was sure to change the world.

In reality though…not so much.

Turns out I’ve got a bit of an art history bias and sort of forgot about the other types of museums out there. Like the natural history or science museums.

Oopsies!

Not to give my fellow students a bad rap. Networking with archaeologists and scientists has some pretty cool benefits. And there are a lot of people out there who either haven’t given art the time of day, or walked away from it rather quickly because they “didn’t get it”. There are even times where I myself struggle to understand a theory or philosophy an artist is trying to address in their work.

But thank goodness for the internet! Google searches, podcasts, and videos have certainly answered a lot of questions I’ve had about what the heck some artists are doing. And joining that resource list is a member of our MIA team, Educational Coordinator Alysa Procida!

 

Recently she was asked by Lifestyle Goddess to talk about some of the pieces in the MIA collection. In the short segments, Alysa quickly covers portions of an artist’s biography in order to give the viewer context but without over burdening them with lots of detail or complicated terminology.

I’ll admit that before starting my internship here at MIA, I had never heard of Mattiusi Iyaituk before. But after watching Alysa’s video, and understanding his style and motivations I’ve been able to walk around the MIA’s collection pointing out his sculptures without referencing any labels. Success!!!

Alysa has also discussed the work of Bart Hanna  and Abraham Anghik Ruben in two other videos, which I hope you’ll enjoy as much as I have. And hopefully they’ll make you feel like you’ve finally arrived at the “art getters” club.

posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Educational Assistant

Let’s Talk About…Whalebone!

13 Apr

Many visitors coming into the Museum are often drawn in by our two large sculptures which are placed in the lobby. One of our frequently asked questions is what these are made of. Many guests guess that it is a type of wood because of the porous nature of the material.  The answer is that they are made of aged whalebone. Whalebone used in sculpture is old, not new. New whalebone is oily, smells, and will splinter if carved. Therefore, the older the bone, the better it is for carving.

Abraham Anghik Ruben's (1951-) "Memories: An Ancient Past" (2010), whalebone, stone, wood, Private Collection.

MIA's Development Officer, Karolina Tomaszewska with the reverse side of Abraham Anghik Ruben's (1951-) "Memories: An Ancient Past" (2010), whalebone, stone, wood, Private Collection
Note the spot for the spinal cord to fit into!

These bones come from the base of the whale’s skull and the round holes you can see are where the spinal cord fits into the skull. Many people assume that these are vertebrae, but vertebrae look quite different.

Whale skeleton-the highlighted portion is where the bone for the sculptures comes from!

A whale vertebra

Note how the shape of the vertebra is much different from the sculptures featured in our lobby!

Karolina with Manasie Akpaliapik's (1955-) "Spirit World of the Inuit", whalebone, stone, ivory, Private Collection.
Once again, note the space where the spinal cord fits in!

Can you find other pieces made from whalebone in the Museum? Drop by and let us know! We have quite a few!

Posted by: Karolina Tomaszewska, MIA’s Development Officer

Playing Favourites: Ivy, Sarphina, Tiffany, Ursula and Nelson, August 8, 2011

11 Aug

Playing Favourites is a running series featuring MIA visitors, staff and volunteers with their favorite objects in our collection.  Playing Favourites is open to every person at MIA, so please let us know if you’d like to participate the next time you visit.

MIA visitors Ivy, Sarphina, Tiffany, Ursula and Nelson with “Memories: An Ancient Past” (2010) by Abraham Anghik Ruben (1951 – ), Paulatuk, NWT/Salt Spring Island, BC, Whalebone, stone, wood, Private Collection on Loan to MIA

Toronto

What brings you to MIA? Is this your first visit?

Yes, the art and sculptures.

Why is this your favourite piece in the collection?

It tells us the old tales and legends in a new way.

Posted by: Jessica Cappuccitti, MIA’s Volunteer Coordinator

Playing Favourites: Dena S, August 8, 2011

11 Aug

Playing Favourites is a running series featuring MIA visitors, staff and volunteers with their favorite objects in our collection.  Playing Favourites is open to every person at MIA, so please let us know if you’d like to participate the next time you visit.

MIA visitor Dena S. with “Freedom of Flight” (2009) by Abraham Anghik Ruben (1951 – ), Paulatuk, NWT/Salt Spring Island, BC, Stone, Metal, MIA Collection

MIA visitor Dena S. with the globe, discovering the distance between her home country, Germany and the Arctic.

Where are you from?

Germany (Cologne)

What brings you to MIA? Is this your first visit?

Yes.  Interest in Inuit art.

Why is this your favourite piece in the collection?

Because it was pretty!

Posted by: Jessica Cappuccitti, MIA’s Volunteer Coordinator

Playing Favourites: Annie S., July 24, 2011

25 Jul

Playing Favourites is a running series featuring MIA visitors, staff and volunteers with their favorite objects in our collection.  Playing Favourites is open to every person at MIA, so please let us know if you’d like to participate the next time you visit.

MIA visitor Annie S. with "Memories: An Ancient Past" (2010) by Abraham Anghik Ruben (1951 - ), Paulatuk, NWT/Salt Spring Island, BC, Whalebone, stone, wood, Private Collection on Loan to MIA

Where are you from?

Palestine

What brings you to MIA? Is this your first visit?

Yes, it was introduced to me by a friend.

Why is this your favourite piece in the collection?

I love the intricacy of this piece. The details are gorgeous, it tells me so many stories. Also, whales are my favourite animal – the fact that this is made out of whalebone, I just fell in love with it.

Posted by: Alysa Procida, MIA’s Educational Coordinator

Playing Favourites: Farah V. and Fereshteh V., July 10, 2011

14 Jul

Playing Favourites is a running series featuring MIA visitors, staff and volunteers with their favorite objects in our collection.  Playing Favourites is open to every person at MIA, so please let us know if you’d like to participate the next time you visit.

MIA visitor Farah V. and Fereshteh V., with "Memories: An Ancient Past" by Abraham Anghik Ruben (1951 - ), Paulatuk, NWT, Whalebone, stone, wood, Private Collection on Loan to MIA

Where are you from?

USA

What brings you to MIA? Is this your first visit?

The art – new to the Inuit Art

Why is this your favourite piece in the collection?

It shows love, art, creativity, details, symbolism, natural material used.

Posted by: Jessica Cappuccitti, MIA’s Volunteer Coordinator