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Introducing Our New Community Engagement Intern!

14 May

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Hello, my name is Tom and I am the new Community Engagement Intern here at the Museum of Inuit Art! I’ve been volunteering as a docent with MIA since August 2014. As a docent, I have had many wonderful opportunities to gain community engagement experience and I’m hoping to expand on that during my internship. Aside from my public docent tours that lead visitors through popular themes in Inuit art, stylistic differences across the Canadian Arctic, and the various types of material used to create the art, I’ve also assisted with several special events – you may have seen me during March Break and Winterfest! I’ve also had the opportunity to deliver MAP Family Saturday programing where I’ve visited Toronto Public Library branches and brought out museum artifacts from the museum’s Educational Collection for Hands-On sessions, played traditional Inuit games and led art activities so visitors could bring their own piece of art back home. I’ve also been attending a Museum Management and Curatorship program at Fleming College over the course of the past year. This program helped me develop a solid foundation of knowledge upon which to build my museum experience. While the program involved all sorts of work including care of collections and exhibition development, I’ve always had a strong interest in working with the public. When I needed to seek out a placement for an Internship for the MMC program, the MIA stood out to me both due to my cherished experience with the museum as well as the fact that I knew it had a lot of community programing coming up over the spring and summer. I was very happy that the Museum was willing to host my internship, and am excited to have the opportunity to develop my skills during my time here. I am really excited to be a part of the MIA team, thanks for having me! – Posted by Tom E., MIA’s Outreach Intern

Introducing our new Collections Intern!

8 May
Taylor
Hi! My name is Taylor Maunder and I am excited to be the new Collection Management Intern.

 

I am currently a student at Georgian College’s Museum and Gallery Studies post-graduate program. I came into this program after starting my university career at the University of Ottawa as a Science student. It wasn’t until my second year there that I found, and fell in-love with, the university’s Classical Studies program. After switching programs midway through my second year, I found a little museum associated with the school, the Museum of Classical Antiquities. As a third year student I began volunteering there and soon began to love museum work, working up with objects so often left behind glass. So I decided to pursue a career in museum work.

 

And so I searched for an internship position which would allow me to working with a collection of objects that I found interesting and knew little about. This, of course, led me to the Museum of Inuit Art. I will be the Collections Management Intern for the next four months where I will be working beside Lauren Williams and the other staff of MIA to gain as much knowledge as I can! I hope to be gaining knowledge on current museum practices, applying some of my schooling, and of course learning about Inuit Art, the culture and the artists.

 

– Posted by Taylor M., MIA’s Collections Intern

A Final Farewell from Our Collections Management Intern

30 Apr

Four months has gone by incredibly fast for me here at the Museum of Inuit Art! It’s been exceptionally rewarding and informative and I believe that I have learned a considerable amount compared to when I first started in January as the Collections Management Intern. I’ve learned how to catalog and condition report, accession objects and how to move them safely around the museum. I have also how difficult it can be to put up exhibition text panels (it’s surprisingly time-consuming). I’m incredibly grateful to my supervisor, Lauren, for sharing with me her collections wisdom and prowess and providing me with a place where I could learn what’s required for a professional career in museum collections management. Who knew that box making could be a quantifiable skill? I certainly did not, but it’s one that I now have (and like to brag about).

Since the museum has pieces made from a variety of types of materials, I have been able to learn a lot about proper care and storage procedures for substances such as stone, ivory, bone and antler, materials I didn’t think I would ever work closely with. The collection here at the museum is both amazing and diverse and I’m so glad that I have been able to learn and work with the objects, mostly the carvings of arctic wildlife. I now have a particular fondness for all things narwhal and walrus, like this handsome guy by Joanassie Oomayoualook who’s just so chubby and adorable.

Joanassie Oomyoualook

[Walrus] by Joanassie Oomayoualook (1934- ), Inukjuk, stone, ivory, MIA Collection, 2013.4.24.

– Posted by Beth P., MIA’s Collections Managment Intern

Introducing Our New Programming and Outreach Assistant!

22 Feb
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MIA’s newest staff member Caitlin H. with her favourite piece at the museum “Fire Spirits Rising” (2008) by David Ruben Piqtoukun (1951 – ) Paulatuk, stone, charcoal

 

My name is Caitlin Hudson, and I am the new Programming and Outreach Assistant at the MIA! I’m a graduate of the Applied Museum Studies program at Algonquin College, and over the past few years I’ve had the opportunity to work in museums, art galleries, and archives all across Ontario. I have worked in many different areas of museums (including collections, exhibitions, and programming), and I’m always looking for an opportunity to learn something new. I have little experience working with Inuit Art, so working at the MIA is the perfect opportunity for me to diversify my knowledge of art and art history.

I’m going to be working on a lot of different projects here, including developing new and exciting programming for visitors of all ages, and working on different outreach initiatives. I’m so excited to join the MIA team, and I look forward to meeting you at an upcoming programming event! Be sure to check out the museum’s events page to see what I’ll have in store you for this month for March Break and other special dates and programming.

– Posted by Caitlin H., MIA’s Programming and Outreach Assistant

Introducing Our New Collections Manager Intern!

13 Jan

Beth

My name is Beth Pufall and I am currently a student at Centennial College as part of the Culture and Heritage Site Management post-graduate program. I am pleased to join the MIA as the Collections Management Intern.

Having completed my bachelor’s degree in art history, I have a passion for art and culture and how they can be articulated through the museum experience. Already, I am enjoying learning about Inuit art, a subject that I have little experience with. Through my internship here at MIA, I am excited to immerse myself in the world of museum collections and gain knowledge about handling museum objects. Over the next four months I’m most looking forward to working with the objects in the MIA’s collection, which are both diverse and intriguing.

– Posted by Beth P., MIA’s Collections Manager Intern

Introducing Our New Development Intern!

13 Jan

Natasha A

Hi! My name is Natasha Ali and I am the new Development Intern at MIA.

After completing my undergraduate in history and art history at the University of Toronto, I decided to seek out a profession within the arts, culture and heritage industry. Currently I am attending Centennial College where I am working toward obtaining a post graduate certificate in cultural and heritage site management. I have been provided with a wonderful opportunity to join the MIA team for the next four months.

Working alongside Lindsay Bontoft, the Development Coordinator and Brittany Holliss, the Digital Assets Coordinator, I will be actively exploring new ways of seeking out prospective donors as well as increasing membership through the promotion of MIA’s collections and exhibitions. With a passion for connecting communities to their local arts and heritage institutions, I hope to generate support for the museum’s “Businesses Make MIA Free” program which will increase the public’s access to understanding Inuit art.

– Posted By: Natasha Ali, MIA’s Development Intern

‘Nuliajuk’ Comes to MIA

20 Nov
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MIA Collections Manager Lauren Williams receives a wall hanging from Jacob Keanik, President/Chair of the Gjoa Haven Heritage Society

Last week the museum had a group of special guests visit the museum. And they came a loooong way for a tour!

Despite a few flight delays and a battle through Toronto traffic, Obrian Kydd from the Nunavut Economic Developers Association and Jacob Keanik, the President/Chair of the Nattilik Heritage Society  made the trip from Uqsuqtuuq (Gjoa Haven) to MIA as one of their Toronto stops.

Touring through the museum exhibitions, MIA staff introduced our ‘Follow Your Art’  program – used to help identify the different styles seen in Inuit Art-  and of course we wanted to showcase all the unique and talented artists whose works are represented in the museum. It was such a real thrill to see Obrian and Jacob recognize pieces their friends had made and hear some of the stories behind the sculptures.

After an exciting brain storming session about future programming and a good chuckle about the Franklin Expedition discovery/the importance of oral history MIA staff were speechless when we were presented with a beautiful wall hanging made by Helen Kaloon!

Helen Wallhanging

“Nuliayok” (2013) by Helen Kaloon (1959- ) Uqsuqtuuq (Gjoa Haven), duffle and embroidery thread, MIA Collection.

This duffle wall hanging shows a scene from the story of Nuliajuk, who many of our visitors may also know as ‘Sedna’. Although there are different variations to the story, the main elements are consistent across story tellers and Nuliajuk is always credited as being the creator of the sea-life found in the Arctic. Depending on who is telling the story, some people will describe how Nuliajuk tried to flee her husband by clinging to the side of  her father’s boat during a rescue attempt while another version describes Nuliajuk swimming into the Arctic ocean in an attempt to catch up to her parents who have abandoned her. In both accounts, to release Nuliajuk from the boat her fingers are cut off. Unable to hold onto the boat any longer,  she sinks into the ocean where her severed fingers transform into the sea animals who now inhabit the Arctic ocean.

We hope Helen’s ‘Nuliajuk’ wall hanging likes her view of Lake Ontario, we’ll certainly enjoy having her as an artist ambassador for the Kitikmeot Region here at the museum.

– Posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Digital Assets Coordinator

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