Tag Archives: exhibition

Worldwide Knit in Public Day!

5 Jun

IMG_3376   MIA front lobby podium covered in crochet hexagons to celebration of Worldwide Knit in Public Day.

June is a pretty big month here at MIA. This coming Saturday we will officially be reopening our doors to welcome in brand new exhibitions featuring even more examples of art styles, materials, and themes. We’ll also be celebrating National Aboriginal History Month with fun games and prizes AND we’ve just launched another community based project with local Toronto knitting groups (including the Bissell Bombers) as part of  World Wide Knit in Public Day!

For those unfamiliar with WWKiP Day, it all began back in 2005 when Danielle Landes gathered together a group of knitters. Rather than perform this traditionally solitary practice alone, they created an opportunity to spend some time together and really get to know their neighbors. That desire for human interaction and creative outlet inspired others to join and over the following years a simple day of knitting has turned into a global public art movement.

This Saturday and Sunday, MIA will be hosting knit inspired programming in our newly renovated space. From 12-4 visitors can join our Arts Assistants who will be giving demonstrations on the several different methods of pom pom making and how to create a bracelet with needle-less knitting techniques.

Special community exhibition case be prepared for visitor contributions as a part of Worldwide Knit in Public Day celebrations.

All of these yarn creations can be tokens of a fun day spent knitting out in public, or you can have them displayed in our special exhibition area. For the entire month of June, MIA has dedicated a public curated space to showcase the unique talent within the community. Those who wish to participate by bringing supplies and taking part of our Knit in Public activities receive FREE admission.

Hope to see all you crafters this weekend!

- Posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

MIA’s AR FAQ (and a bunch of other letters) explained

17 Jul

In my past AR blog post I wrote about how other museums were using AR (augmented realty), and showed you a few clips of the crazy things people have been creating with this type of technology. But I have yet to explain how MIA will be taking this brand new technology and giving our exhibits a bit of a twist. Today’s blog is all about how MIA has envisioned our first steps into this augmented world…

The MIA’s mandate is concerned with both preserving the objects we hold in public trust and educating that public about the culture and people those objects came from. And the public we serve is not necessarily limited to only those visitors who can physically enter our space, we have also reached out to an online public through our social media platforms.

Supplementing traditional museum practices with new technology has allowed us to both reach a larger audience and expand points of access that people can approach the collection from. While not everyone currently owns a smartphone and therefore won’t be able to take advantage of the AR we have running now, smartphones are becoming more and more popular as mobile companies create increasingly affordable data plans and the price of the phones themselves decrease. It’s not hard to image that in the future smartphones (or something even more high tech) will become the mobile standard.

Incorporating AR into our exhibits is not about being flashy and following trends. We’re really dedicated to offering more options on how to view and interact with our collection. All the different points of access MIA has available allows for the visitor to create their own experiences and connect with the collection on a more personal level. Just as some people might not want to read text panels, some people might not want to wave their phone over an entire collection – but the choice is there to be made.

Our current AR channel for the MIA’s latest exhibition Christian Morrisseau: New Directions 2010-2012 includes additional paintings, audio interviews of the artist, and images of his working process. And all smartphone uses have to do is follow these simple steps:

  1. Through your smartphone market place, download the free Junaio Augmented Reality application
  2. Open the app and scan this special QR code
  3. Select the channel MIA Christian Morrisseau New Directions Exhibit
  4. Slowly wave your phone across various Christian Morrisseau paintings to reveal extra content

Ta da!

Curious to see what else you can find hidden in the digital relm?
You can checkout the Christian Morrisseau: New Directions 2010-2012 exhibition on now in our new Aboriginal Voices Gallery.

- posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA Visitor Services Officer

New Gallery, New Installation!

8 Jul

Getting our new Aboriginal Voices Gallery set up for a new exhibition!

Exciting exhibition news! This week marks the beginning of both a new gallery AND a new installation at MIA!

In a few days we will officially be opening Christian Morrisseau: New Directions 2010-2012 in our new Aboriginal Voices Gallery, but in the meantime we thought it would be pretty cool to show you how we’re setting everything up.

Some of our “Tweet Peeks”. Can you guess what some of these images are?

In case you missed our Tweets and Facebook updates, the first step in our installation process was to tease you all with photos. We even made up a game where we show you a close up image of one of Christian Morrisseau’s paintings and have you guess what kind of woodlands creature it might be. A few of you got the right answers, but now it’s time to more or less officially reveal exactly what we’ll be exhibiting.

Our latest installation features the work of Woodlands artist Christian Morrisseau and represents an important moment in his artistic career. As the son of legendary painter Norval Morrisseau, Christian was introduced to painting by prepping the background scenes for his father. Years later, his contribution to the Woodlands School comes from not only continuing his father’s legacy examining the use of colour in Aboriginal art. This MIA exhibition has grouped several of his works into colour combinations – each representing a different theme such as family or healing.

Movers installing “Bringing Kyle Home” (2012) by Christian Morrisseau, Keewaywin, acrylic on canvas, Private Collection on loan to MIA

And these paintings are HUGE!
So big in fact that we couldn’t put all of Christian’s colour themed paintings together in one place – well, at least not in one physical space…
Which leads us to another thing we here at the museum have been teasing our readers about.
Remember how weeks and weeks ago I, your pesky intern, started dropping hints about a new tech toy we had been experimenting with? Well, this exhibition will be the first time that MIA incorporates AR (Augmented Reality) into our exhibitions!!

Since Christian’s paintings are so big and we wanted to make sure you got a chance to see as many you could, we’re using AR to display virtual versions of his work. As you move throughout the exhibition, you’ll be able to wave your smartphone in front of his paintings and access additional works from his colour series, audio interview clips between Christian Morrisseau and MIA staffer Alysa Procida, and progress images that show his painting process.

While we’re still setting up the space you’ll be able to watch as we do the heavy lifting in order to get the physical space all set up for the show. For more images be sure to visit our Flickr page and brand new Instagram account (our username is miamuseum).

Movers installing “Keewaywin First Nation Chief Joe Meekis” (2012) by Christian Morrisseau, Keewaywin, acrylic on canvas, Private Collection on loan to MIA

- Posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Educational Assistant

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