Tag Archives: educational programming

Intern Insights

3 May

Hello again!

I can hardly believe it, but the first week of internship is over and I’ve managed to get quite a lot done. It’s been a productive week and I’m excited to move into the next phase of teacher resource development for the MIA.

After getting through some comprehensive literature about museum policy, programming, accessibility and governance, I jumped right into the best part about this internship—lesson planning! To be honest, it was a bit overwhelming at first, in terms of figuring out what grade level to start with, what direction to take with the lesson (Arts-based? Language-focused? History-oriented?), and making sure to include as many pertinent details and guidelines for teachers as possible. I decided to start with the grades I knew best—Junior-Intermediate. For those that may not be too familiar with teacher speak, that means grades 4-10. Luckily, I had the wonderful opportunity to experience teaching grades 4-8, so I was quite familiar with the general concepts and basic expectations covered in the curriculum.

Kamiks (Arctic snow boots made of animal skin) worn by Labrador Inuit

After consulting with my supervisor, Alysa, we decided a little “museum field trip” was required. On Wednesday, I shadowed a docent at the Bata Shoe Museum giving a tour to a group of middle school students. It was truly fascinating to see how an everyday item that we sometimes take for granted, like footwear, can have an extraordinary history and offers rich insights into the culture that produced it. My visit here also reinforced the importance of artifact-based teaching and learning as an excellent way for students to develop multidisciplinary skills. It’s certainly a learning model that the Bata Shoe Museum and the MIA have nurtured successfully via their docent program.

With some research of my own, and a few great online sources recommended to me by Alysa, I was able to pull together several arts-based lesson plans for grades 4-12 with cross-curricular connections to Social Studies, Language and even Science. The next step will be to edit, polish and tack on assessment guides to these materials before getting a stamp of approval from the Museum.

More updates to come during week 2!

- Posted by: Aviva German, MIA’s Educational Intern

Introducing Our New Educational Intern!

29 Apr

Greetings!

Aviva

My name is Aviva German and I’m the newest member of the MIA team! Over the next month, I’ll be working here at the museum as an Educational Intern. As a teacher candidate from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, and a previous volunteer at the museum, I’m thrilled to come back and begin my internship at this one-of-a-kind site!

I’m looking forward to developing and sharing a variety of exciting pre- and post-museum visit materials and outreach kits, in alignment with provincial curriculum expectations, to complement any school group visit to the MIA. My goal is to provide educators with the tools they need to begin the museum experience inside the classroom, and encourage students to continue exploring critical themes related to Aboriginal peoples and cultures following their visit.

I hope these materials will be prove to be an invaluable resource for teachers and students alike!

- Posted by: Aviva German, MIA’s Educational Intern

Be Part of MIA: Adopt an Object

11 Jan

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This year, MIA is  really excited to launch a new fundraising program: Adopt an Object!

Supporters of art made by Inuit can now select a piece of the museums Permanent Collection currently on display and symbolically “adopt” that piece for a one year term. MIA’s staff members have selected some of their favourite objects as candidates for adoption based on their unique characteristics, notable history and impressive craftsmanship. Each of these pieces will be highlighted in future blog posts, so be sure to check back in and see our selection.

The ‘Adoption Package’ includes:

  • a photograph and description of the piece you have chosen to adopt, which you can proudly display in your home, office or classroom
  • names of individuals will be entitled to have their names listed as Adopters on the object labels within the museum space
  • recognition on our websites Donors’ page
  • name included in the museum’s Annual Report
  • invitation to a special cocktail reception to thank all participants for their generous contributions to the museum
  • additional programming opportunities are also available upon discussion with the Associate Curator Alysa Procida

All funds raised from this initiative will go directly into the educational programming and continued preservation of MIA’s collection. As a public institution that holds its work in public trust, conservation of the museum’s collection is one of MIA’s top priorities. This is especially true for those objects made out of sensitive materials such as ivory, textile or paper. At the same time, MIA is southern Canada’s only museum devoted exclusively to art made by Inuit, meaning that the museums ability to effectively offer engaging educational programming is crucial. Through the Adopt an Object program, staff hope to acquire resources to help us manage these challenges. This will allow us to continue to educate the public about the art and its conservation.

Adoption Rates:

  • Small stone, antler and ivory pieces                                              $150
  • Medium stone, antler and ivory pieces                                         $300
  • Large stone, antler and ivory pieces                                              $500
  • Ceramic pieces                                                                                   $200
  • Wall hangings and soft sculpture works                                       $200
  • Prints and textile pieces                                                                   $200
  • Prints and Wall hangings made by Master Artists                     $700
  • Sculptures made by Master Artists                                                $1,000

All donors adopting an object will be issues a tax receipt. Rates are established based on the material and size of the artifact being adopted. After the priority works listed above have been adopted, additional opportunities will become available.

We thank all those that choose to support us in this endeavor by adopting an object. It is through the generous contributions of such individuals that we are able to further our mission: “to ethically acquire, conserve, research, communicate and exhibit for the purpose of study, education and enjoyment, material evidence of the history of Inuit art and culture in the Canadian Arctic”.

- Posted by: Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

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