Tag Archives: adopt an object

Adopt an Object: Spirits

26 Feb
Spirit edited

This is piece “Spirits” by Karoo Ashevak is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

During this round of fundraising, this is the last piece to be featured as part of  the MIA’s new  ‘Adopt an Object’ program. In our past blogs we’ve highlighted a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Karoo Ashevak’s “Spirits”

Artist: Karoo Ashevak (1940 – 1974)
Location: Talurjuak (Taloyoak/Spence Bay), Nunavut
Date: c. 1972 – 1974
Medium: Bone, stone, baleen
Dimensions (H x W x D): 15” x 8” x 5”
Collection: Sprott/MIA Collection

Significance: Karoo Ashevak, a master artist, revolutionized sculpting in the Kitikmeot Region through his innovative use of whalebone, inlay and transformative figures; Spirits showcases all of these notable elements. This piece also holds a special place in the museum’s institutional history, having been selected as the official avatar for all official publication streams. Something that might not be evident at first glance is the fact that the back of this piece is also sculpted. Adopt this staff favourite and you’ll have the opportunity to see a whole new side to this piece!

Adoption Rate: $1,000

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: Walking Bear

23 Feb
Pauta Saila 4 edited

This piece “Walking Bear” by Pauta Saila is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Paula Saila’s  “Walking Bear”
This same piece was selected by our current Visitor Services officer Brittany Holliss back when she first started as a museum intern last summer.

Artist: Pauta Saila, RCA (1916 – 2009)
Location: Kinngait (Cape Dorset)
Date: 1994
Medium: Stone, bone
Dimensions (H x W x D): 9” x 18” x 9.5”
Collection: MIA Collection

Significance: Pauta Saila is widely acknowledged as one of the top master artists from the Arctic, a fact that is made all the clearer by his having been inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Art (RCA). He is one of the first Inuit artists to benefit from creating a unique, individual style, choosing to focus primarily on the subject of polar bears. With its subtle muscularity, monumental features and ivory teeth, Walking Bear is an excellent example of the Paula Saila pieces that collectors have come to love.

Adoption Rate: $1,000

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: The Enchanted Owl

20 Feb
Kenojuak Ashevak Enchanted Owl edited

This colour trial proof “The Enchanted Owl” by Kenojuak Ashevak is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Kenojuak Ashevak’s “The Enchanted Owl”

Artist: Kenojuak Ashevak, CC, RCA (1927-2013)
Location: Kinngait (Cape Dorset)
Date: 1960
Medium: Colour Trial Paper
Dimensions (L x W): 22” x 26”
Collection: MIA Collection

Significance: The Enchanted Owl is arguably the most iconic Inuit print produced to date, made popular by its appearance on a commemorative postage stamp in 1970 celebrating the centennial anniversary of the North West Territories. MIA is lucky to have in its collection a colour trial proof of The Enchanted Owl, which captures the intermediary stage of testing the colour for this stonecut print prior to the momentous decision to split the run of the print. This resulted in a rare example of an Inuit print being produced in two colours—twenty-five being produced in red and twenty-five being produced in green. This work by Kenojuak Ashevak, a master Inuit artist, was featured in the first Cape Dorset Print Collection released to the public in 1960.

Adoption Rate: $700

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: Journey to Summer Camp

17 Feb
Romeo Eekerkik - Journey to Summer Camp edited

This piece “Journey to Summer Camp” by Romeo Eekerkik is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Romeo Eekerkik’s “Journey to Summer Camp”

Artist: Romeo Eekerkik (1923 – 1983)
Location: Arviat
Date: c. 1970s
Medium: Antler
Dimensions (H x W x D): 6” x 16” x 8”
Collection: Sprott/MIACollection

Significance: This piece is a great example of how artists in the Kivalliq Region use caribou antler, a material in great supply in this area, in a skillful way. Romeo takes advantage of all the properties of the medium in this piece, pushing it farther than most other artists. While most antler sculptures usually depict figures that are tall and skinny, here he uses the antler temporally, depicting a physical journey in space. He shifts the antler horizontally to create a base and then carves proportional figures.

Adoption Rate: $500

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: Transforming Shaman

14 Feb
Peggy Ekagina Transforming Shaman 3 edited

This “Transforming Shaman” by Peggy Ekagina is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Peggy Ekagina’s “Transforming Shaman”

Artist: Peggy Ekagina (1919 – 1992)
Location: Kuguktuk (Coppermine)
Date: c. 1970s
Medium: Stone
Dimensions (H x W x D): 9” x 14” x 4”
Collection: MIA Collection

Significance: Transforming Shaman highlights a major theme in art made by Inuit, which often depicts images of spirituality. Traditional Inuit spirituality incorporates ideas of animism; that is, that most everything has a spirit which is transferred or recycled, and as such many pieces of art depict scenes of transformation. In this piece the angukak or shaman is transforming into a muskox. This sculpture of a transformation has several unique aspects. The fact that the angukak is transforming into a land mammal is notable; the artist is showing the range of the role of the angukak through this piece as not being limited to interceding on behalf of Inuit with the sea goddess. Peggy’s decision not to incorporate human hands into the piece is also notable while many enthusiasts recognize the way in which most artists from the Kivalliq Region emphasize the hands as a symbol that the angukak is able to turn back into his/her human form, that tradition changes based on location.

Adoption Rate: $500

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: Drum Dancers

11 Feb
Luke (Lukie) Airut Drum Dancers 3edited

This jawbone piece “Drum Dancers” by Luke (Lukie) Airut is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – Luke (Lukie) Airut’s “Drum Dancers”

Artist: Luke (Lukie) Airut (b. 1942)
Location: Igulik
Date: 2007
Medium: Jawbone, ivory, baleen
Dimensions (H x W x D): 7” x 5” x 3”
Collection: MIA Collection

Significance: Luke Airut is well known for his intricate carving and use of organic materials. Drum Dancers incorporates all these hallmarks—the amount of detail in the people and animals within the piece is truly amazing for working in such a small scale. This is also one of the museum’s most prized possessions as this sculpture is our only example of a sculpture created using a walrus jawbone, a material that needs exceptional skill to carve!

Adoption Rate: $300

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

Adopt an Object: Mother and Child

8 Feb
Pilipusi Novalinga edited

This “Mother and Child” which has been attributed to Pilipusi Novalinga is part of the MIA’s new Adopt an Object fundraising initiative.

As part of  the MIA’s new fundraising initiative ‘Adopt an Object’, we’ll be highlighting a featured item from our Permanent Collection that staff have chosen to represent some of  the unique pieces we display in the museum. For more information on the program itself and what it means to be a donor, you can check out our past blog post.

Today, we’re highlighting a staff favourite – “Mother and Child”

Artist: Attributed to Pilipusi Novalinga (1906 – 1987)
Location: Inukjuak
Date: c. 1950s
Medium: Stone, ivory
Dimensions (H x W x D): 8” x 5” x 5”
Collection: Sprott/MIA Collection

Significance: This piece was created in Inukjuak, Nunavut, which is widely considered the “birth place” of modern Inuit art as we know and understand it today. Mother and Child demonstrates the closeness of families in the Arctic, one of the major themes of Inuit art. Two of the major characteristics of art produced in Nunavik shine through this piece: the tenderness which builds between a child and their mother while she carries them for the first three years of life in her amautik; and the intricate details in the face and hair of the people provides a realistic depiction of the subject both emotionally and physically.

Adoption Rate: $300

To adopt this piece, contact our curator Alysa at aprocida [at] miamuseum [dot] ca.

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- Posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA’s Visitor Services Officer

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