MIA’s AR FAQ (and a bunch of other letters) explained

17 Jul

In my past AR blog post I wrote about how other museums were using AR (augmented realty), and showed you a few clips of the crazy things people have been creating with this type of technology. But I have yet to explain how MIA will be taking this brand new technology and giving our exhibits a bit of a twist. Today’s blog is all about how MIA has envisioned our first steps into this augmented world…

The MIA’s mandate is concerned with both preserving the objects we hold in public trust and educating that public about the culture and people those objects came from. And the public we serve is not necessarily limited to only those visitors who can physically enter our space, we have also reached out to an online public through our social media platforms.

Supplementing traditional museum practices with new technology has allowed us to both reach a larger audience and expand points of access that people can approach the collection from. While not everyone currently owns a smartphone and therefore won’t be able to take advantage of the AR we have running now, smartphones are becoming more and more popular as mobile companies create increasingly affordable data plans and the price of the phones themselves decrease. It’s not hard to image that in the future smartphones (or something even more high tech) will become the mobile standard.

Incorporating AR into our exhibits is not about being flashy and following trends. We’re really dedicated to offering more options on how to view and interact with our collection. All the different points of access MIA has available allows for the visitor to create their own experiences and connect with the collection on a more personal level. Just as some people might not want to read text panels, some people might not want to wave their phone over an entire collection – but the choice is there to be made.

Our current AR channel for the MIA’s latest exhibition Christian Morrisseau: New Directions 2010-2012 includes additional paintings, audio interviews of the artist, and images of his working process. And all smartphone uses have to do is follow these simple steps:

  1. Through your smartphone market place, download the free Junaio Augmented Reality application
  2. Open the app and scan this special QR code
  3. Select the channel MIA Christian Morrisseau New Directions Exhibit
  4. Slowly wave your phone across various Christian Morrisseau paintings to reveal extra content

Ta da!

Curious to see what else you can find hidden in the digital relm?
You can checkout the Christian Morrisseau: New Directions 2010-2012 exhibition on now in our new Aboriginal Voices Gallery.

- posted by Brittany Holliss, MIA Visitor Services Officer

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One Response to “MIA’s AR FAQ (and a bunch of other letters) explained”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Small Museum, Big Digitial Projects: Our Perspective « Peek Inside the Museum of Inuit Art - November 29, 2012

    […] lists a number of projects in her article that we have created, both on-site and off, which you can read more about on our blog. But the real question is why do we bother making any of these? […]

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